Nuka Dark Rum Is Insulting

Fallout Nuka Dark Header

Alright… this isn’t going to win me any fans, but I think someone in the Fallout community needs to say it. Nuka Dark rum is insulting. It is symbolic of a big rusty nail in the coffin of the Fallout franchise.

What do I mean by that? Fallout is bigger than ever. Its games are incredibly popular and review really well. That’s kind of the problem. Bethesda has taken a Disneyesque approach to branding. The focus is not on Fallout, the video game, it’s on Fallout the Lunchbox, Fallout the doll and yes… Fallout the dark rum. Continue reading

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Deconstructing Fallout 3: Difficulty Curve

Deconstructing Fallout 3


Fallout World Map

From a design perspective, one of Fallout 3’s biggest hurdles was managing the difficulty curve in an open world. Fallout and Fallout 2 addressed this by placing Vault 13 and Arroyo in the far north while crafting a narrative that relied on unlocking the location of new, more difficult settlements. In terms of structure, these games also benefited from a timer, discouraging players from exploring the vacant wasteland in favor of following the story.

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Deconstructing Fallout 3: Andale

Deconstructing Fallout 3

When I first played Fallout 3 on my Xbox 360 way back in 2008, I found myself drawn to the hubs and the quests. Exploring the wasteland was fun, but ultimately I was looking for structure and a story. I’ve recently booted up Fallout 3 again, but this time on the PC. With extreme (but lore friendly) modding, I’ve found the exploration aspect far more enjoyable and the quests frankly lackluster. I want to deconstruct the quests in Fallout 3 to think about how they work in relation to an open world map and the player character’s development choices.

Let’s start with the basics. Not counting the three childhood quests, Fallout 3 has a total of 66 quests in the base game: 10 story quests, 18 side quests, 22 unmarked side quests, and 16 repeatable fetch quests. Again, I want to briefly break down each of these to see how they’ve made use of the new environment and the RPG elements.


Fallout Cannibal

Andale is a microcosm of bad game design, bad story telling, and bad worldbuilding. The settlement’s associated quest,Our Little Secret, feels like a scene from a hat. It’s a neat idea, but it’s not developed enough to become anything interesting.

The quest begins when you walk a short ways south from Fort Independence. You’ll find three houses and a child playing outdoors. The child tells you he never has a chance to talk to new people because his dad always takes care of them. You’ll then meet an old man who claims the town’s other residents are crazy. If you talk to those other residents, you’ll find out they’re all related and believe they still live in Virginia.

Andale doesn’t exactly make sense in this context. The lore goes that four families (now a single family divided into two houses) have been living on this bombed street for 200 years. This is another microcosm of bad writing and bad game design.
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